Publications

In order to highlight our member’s latest achievements, only the three most recent publications are listed under their selected publications section of their profiles. However, a lot of critical publications have been put forth by the members of the Center for Response-Based Practice and their friends and colleagues. Here you can access a more comprehensive bibliography.

Carriere, J., & Richardson, C. (2013).

Relationship is everything: Holistic approaches to Aboriginal child and youth mental health. First Peoples Child & Family Review, 7(2), 8-26

Carriere, J. & Richardson, C. (2009).

From longing to belonging: An Indigenous critique of applying attachment theory to work with Indigenous families. In S. McKay, D. Fuchs & I. Brown (Eds.), Passion for action in child and family services. Regina, Canada: Canadian Plains Press.

Coates, L. (1997).

Causal attributions in sexual assault trial judgments. Journal of Language and Social Psychology, 16(3), 278-296.

Coates, L., Bavelas, J. B., & Gibson, J. (1994).

Anomalous language in sexual assault trial judgments. Discourse & Society, 5(2), 189-206.

Coates, L., & Wade, A. (2007).

Language and violence: Analysis of four discursive operations. Journal of Family Violence, 22(7), 511-522.

Hanbert, A. (Ed. & Trans.). (2014).

Att tala om motstånd: Från hjälplöst offer till aktivt ubjekt. Tre artiklar om responsbaserat arbete [Speaking of resistance: From the helpless victim to the active subject. Three articles on Response-Based practice]. Gothenburg, Swede

Kinewesquao [Richardson, C.] (2015).

Acknowledging Metis aspirations: Preparing social workers to support Metis families. In J. Carriere & S. Strega (Eds.), Walking this path together: Anti-racist and anti-oppressive child welfare practice. Winnipeg, Canada: Fernwood.

Ney, T., Richardson, C., & Maloney, M. (2015).

Family group decision making: Does it engage Indigenous families in child protection? In J. Carriere & S. Strega (Eds.), Walking this path together: Anti-racist and anti-oppressive child welfare practice. Winnipeg, Canada: Fernwood.

Richardson, C. (2013).

Indigenous women, RCMP and service providers work together for justice: A response-based safety collaboration in the Yukon. Research to Practice Network.

Richardson, C. (2012).

Witnessing life transitions with ritual and ceremony in family therapy: Three examples from a Metis therapist. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 31(3), 68-78.

Richardson, C. (2009).

Metis experiences of social work practice. In J. Carriere & S. Strega (Eds.), Walking this path together: Anti-racist and anti-oppressive child welfare practice. Winnipeg, Canada: Fernwood.

Richardson, C. (2009).

A word is worth a thousand pictures: Working with Aboriginal women who wave experienced violence. In L. R. Ross (Ed.), Feminist counselling: Theories, issues and practice. Toronto, Canada: Women’s Press.

Richardson, C. (2006).

Metis identity creation and tactical responses to oppression and racism. Variegations, 2, 56-71.

Richardson, C. (2005).

Cultural stories and the creation of the self. Relational Child and Youth Care Practice, 18(1), 55-63.

Richardson, C. (2002).

Embodying both oppressor and oppressed: My perspective as a Metis woman. International Journal of Narrative Therapy & Community Work, 2002(1), 83-84.

Richardson, C. (1999).

To all mothers who have lost children–to all children who have lost mothers. In Working with the stories of women’s lives. Adelaide, Australia: Dulwich.

Richardson, C., & Blanchet-Cohen, N. (2000).

Postsecondary education programs for Aboriginal peoples: Achievements and issues. Canadian Journal of Native Education, 24(2), 169-184.

Richardson, C., & Bonnah, S. (2015).

Taking children’s resistance seriously: A Response-Based approach to children experiencing violence. In J. Carriere & S. Strega (Eds.), Walking this path together: Anti-racist and anti-oppressive child welfare practice. Winnipeg, Canada: Fernwood.

Richardson, C., & Nelson, B. (2007).

A change of residence: Government schools and foster homes as sites of forced Aboriginal assimilation. First Peoples Child & Family Review, 3(2), 75-83.

Richardson, C., & Reynolds, V. (2014).

Structuring safety in therapeutic work alongside indigenous survivors of residential schools. Canadian Journal of Native Studies, 34(2), 147.

Richardson, C., & Reynolds, V. (2012).

Here we are, amazingly alive in the work. International Journal of Child, Youth, and Family Studies, 1, 1-19.

Richardson, C., & Wade, A. (2010).

Islands of safety: Restoring dignity in violence prevention work with Indigenous families. First Peoples Child and Family Review, 5(1), 137-155.

Richardson, C., & Wade, A. (2009).

Taking resistance seriously: A Response-Based approach to social work in cases of violence against Indigenous women. In J. Carriere & S. Stregna (Eds.), Walking this path together: Anti-racist and anti-oppressive child welfare practice. Winnipeg, Canada: Fernwood.

Todd, N. & Wade, A. (2004).

Coming to terms with violence and resistance: From a language of effects to a language of responses. In T. Strong & D. Pare (Eds.), Furthering talk: Advances in the discursive therapies. New York, NY: Kluwer Academic/Plenum.

Wade, A. (2007).

Despair, resistance, hope. In C. Flaskas, I. McCarthy, & J. Sheehan (Eds.), Hope and despair in narrative and family therapy: Adversity, Forgiveness and Reconciliation. New York, NY: Routeledge.

Wade, A. (2002).

From a language of effects to responses: Honouring our clients’ resistance to violence. New Therapist.

Wade, A. (1997).

Small acts of living: Everyday resistance to violence and other forms of oppression. Contemporary Family Therapy, 19(1), 23-39.

Wade, A. (1995).

Resistance knowledge: Therapy with Aboriginal persons who have been subjected to violence. In P.H. Stephenson, S. J. Elliot, L.T. Foster, & J. Harris (Eds.), Persistent spirit: Towards understanding aboriginal health in BC. Vancouver, Canada: UBC Press.

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